Dr. Austin on StormFront Freaks Podcast


Dr. Elizabeth Austin, CCM of WeatherExtreme Ltd. was recently interviewed on Storm Front Freaks podcast where she talked about her book and her work as a renowned Forensic Meteorologist.

Click below to listen to Dr. Austin on the Storm Front Freaks podcast.

For additional information, visit http://www.stormfrontfreaks.com

Dr. Elizabeth Austin is elected to private sector of 2017 AMS Council

Dr. Elizabeth Austin, CCM of WeatherExtreme Ltd. has been elected to the 2017 American Meteorological Society Council. The Council is the principal governing body of the Society. It consists of the elective officers, the last two Past-Presidents, and 15 other voting members of the Society, each elected for a three-year term, with one-third retiring each year. Councilors are eligible for reelection but not to consecutive terms. The Executive Director and Secretary–Treasurer shall be members of the Council ex-officio and without the power to vote.

The Council is in general charge of the affairs of the Society, responsible for ensuring that reasonable actions are taken to accomplish the objectives of the Society outlined in the Constitution and Bylaws.

Congratulations Dr. Austin!!

For additional information on the AMS Election information, click here

Rayleigh-Benárd altocumulus

Rayleigh-Benárd altocumulus - Photo Credit: James D. Means PhD
This image, taken looking upward from Mission Beach in San Diego, California, shows a particular cloud type called cirrocumulus stratiformis, with open cells on the left side of the image and a clear boundary showing closed cells on the right- Photo Credit: James D. Means PhD

Visible satellite images of stratocumulus and cumulus clouds will often exhibit hexagon-like structures that meteorologists call “open cell” and “closed cell” convection. The open cells are rings of cloud with rising air where the clouds are, and sinking air in the open middle of the cloud lattice. The closed cells are the reverse—rings of cloud-free sinking air with rising air and clouds in the middle. In both cases rising air causes clouds to form, while sinking air warms and dries the air and clears that region of clouds.
While such open and closed cell structures are easy to see from orbit, they are more rarely seen from the ground, but the image above is a good illustration of this. This image, taken looking upward from Mission Beach in San Diego, California, shows a particular cloud type called cirrocumulus stratiformis, with open cells on the left side of the image and a clear boundary showing closed cells on the right. If you look carefully you can pick out crude hexagons in the open cell region. The difference between what’s happening on the left and right may be no more than a thinning of the moist layer that generated the clouds, that can be enough to change them from open cells to closed cells.
Open and closed cell convection is a particular example of something that fluid dynamicists call convection, first discovered by Thomson when he was cleaning glasses in warm dishwater outside of a pub, then reproduced in the laboratory by Benárd and explained theoretically by Rayleigh. It’s found that cellular convection occurs in a wide variety of thin fluids that are heated from below. The hexagonal cells that often occur are a result of nature packing the cells into a planar space as close to each other as possible.

In Memoriam of Dr. Kelly Redmond

It is with a heavy heart that we write this…yesterday the world lost a great climatologist and dear friend. Dr. Kelly Redmond of the Western Regional Climate Center passed away. We will miss him and his enthusiasm for the climate and weather of this world! His passion for such things as El Niño, La Niña, droughts, and “blobs” of warm water that appeared mysteriously in the Pacific Ocean will be greatly missed.

From all of us at WeatherExtreme Ltd.

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