TWA Flight 800

On July 17, 1996, TWA Flight 800 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean off the southern coast of Long Island, killing all 212 passengers and 18 crew members onboard. The Boeing 747 aircraft departed John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City at approximately 8:00 PM EDT and was destined for Paris, France. The National Transportation Safety Board’s lengthy investigation came to the controversial conclusion that an electrical spark from a faulty/damaged wire caused ignition of the overheated center fuel tank, and subsequent explosion.

Tonight, on the 17 year anniversary of the tragedy, a new documentary titled “TWA Flight 800” will debut on Epix at 8:00 PM. Since the crash, hundreds of witnesses claimed to have seen streaks of light in the sky seconds before the explosion, as if missiles shot the plane out of the sky. There are theories that the investigation was a manipulated government cover-up, and a petition for the NTSB to re-open its investigation on the crash is circling around the country. Former NTSB investigators who worked on this particular crash in the late 90’s speak out regarding the truth about how the 230 victims on a routine flight were suddenly killed.

I am interested in listening to the evidence and eye-witness accounts presented in this documentary, and encourage everyone to give it a watch at some point. More information can be found on the Epix site here: http://press.epixhd.com/programming/twa-flight-800/.

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Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

Future of Sea Level Rise

Dramatic images of flooding associated with hurricane storm surge have been captured along the Gulf Coast and East Coast. But, what would parts of the West Coast look like after a drastic sea level rise? While a hurricane would be classified as a short-term event, long-term sea level rise is considered inevitable, and already occurring by many oceanic and atmospheric scientists.

The Weather Channel posts many interesting articles and photo galleries, such as the story published earlier today on this exact topic. I love to check their page every day, among others, for the latest stories and news. All credit for the images and information belongs to The Weather Channel and artist Nickolay Lamm. Link for direct access: http://www.weather.com/news/science/environment/nickolay-lamm-west-coast-sea-level-rise-pictures-20130711 . While the timing and magnitude of such events are uncertain, it is interesting that some studies suggest significant sea level rise (on the order of a few feet) is very realistic in our lifetime!

Below are a couple of the picture series’ using the San Diego area.

1. Coronado Island:

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AFTER 5-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 12-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 25-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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2. San Diego Convention Center:

NOW
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AFTER 5-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 12-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 25-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

NWS San Diego Visit

Yesterday, Ivory Small (Science and Operations Officer) and the rest of the crew at the National Weather Service WFO in San Diego were kind enough to host a few of us for the day. Kayla Jordan (our summer intern), Jim Purpura (former director at the San Diego WFO), and myself discussed the Elsinore Convergence Zone with Ivory, who has documented several cases and is essentially an expert. There is not a tremendous amount of research on the convergence zone. Severe weather is very real in California, and I believe the public’s lack of awareness for it is a serious problem in our state. As a meteorologist, I want to help improve that.

Our goal in visiting the office was to finalize our research topics for an upcoming joint project, and I’d say it was a very successful day. Thanks again for welcoming us in, NWS San Diego. And an extra special thanks to Ivory for taking the time to meet with us!

Some pictures from the trip…

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The view from outside.

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The view from inside. No wonder they never leave this office…

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Work stations, webcams around the area, and The Weather Channel on 24/7!

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Working can be fun too!

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Ivory (Science and Operations Officer) showing us some data on his work station.

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BUSTED!

Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

July Rain

It’s a strange day in Southern California today. I have lived in California my entire life (both northern and southern) and can’t remember the last time I felt raindrops July. Besides monsoon thunderstorm activity in the mountains, it’s typically a dry tinder box around here this time of year. This shot of moisture wasn’t anything in the ballpark of a drought-buster, but it was nice to see some green on the radar.

From last night through this morning, most locations in San Diego County have only reported a trace of rain, with a few (mostly in the higher elevation) reporting up to 0.05″ of rain so far. Subtropical moisture will continue flowing into Southern California from the southeast through tonight, so showers should linger for a while, and then mostly hug the mountains and deserts as the day progresses. After that, these rather humid and “muggy” conditions (for our standards) should deteriorate starting tomorrow as the subtropical connection is cut, and the pattern transitions back to normal for this time of year. It looks like there is hope for the end of the marine layer mornings along the coast in the near future as well!

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Radar composite at 08:50 PDT showing a rare (and nice) plume of subtropical moisture in the southwest.
(The Weather Channel)

Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

The WeatherExtreme Blog!

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Good day, readers. My name is Stephen Bone. I am a meteorologist with WeatherExtreme, and have been with the company since 2011. I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Atmospheric Science from The University of Nevada, and will be the chief moderator of our blog. I look forward to utilizing this space, and maximizing my experience as a meteorologist by keeping this blog fresh and relevant.

Speaking on behalf of the company, the goals of this blog are to:

  • Update followers on WeatherExtreme updates, news, projects, trips, and events
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I highly encourage anyone reading to send me comments or suggestions. My e-mail is stephen@weatherextreme.com and I am happy to take all feedback. I hope you continue to check back for updates, and enjoy reading. Thank you for stopping by and supporting the blog!

Stephen Bone
Meteorologist