Globe Newswire article- Airbus Perlan Mission II reaches new high altitude in search for world aviation record and new evidence on climate change

Airbus Perlan Mission II, an initiative to soar an engineless glider to the edge of outer space, is conducting climate change research in the skies over Patagonia, where Airbus hopes unusual weather phenomenon will allow the unique aircraft to soar to world-record altitudes this year. Airbus photo by James Darcy.
Airbus Americas, Inc.

Globe Newswire recently reported an article on the Airbus Perlan Mission II. The article details the second set of test flights currently in Argentina as the project continues its’ goal to fly a glider without an engine to the edge of space to collect ground-breaking insights on climate change, weather and high-altitude flights. During the first week of August 2017, Pilots Jim Payne, Morgan Sandercock, Tim Gardner and Miguel Iturmendi have soared the pressurized Perlan 2 glider in a series of flights reaching a maximum altitude to date of 32,500 feet. The ultimate goal for their flights in El Calafate over the next couple of months is to break the world gliding record of 50,727 feet set by Einar Enevoldsen and Steve Fossett in Perlan 1 in 2006. Lastly, the article goes into detail about the company Airbus and their sponsorship of the project along with the additional Airbus Perlan Mission II sponsors, United Technologies, BRS Aerospace, and our company WeatherExtreme Ltd.

To view the full article, click here

Perlan Article in Science Magazine

The Perlan 2 glides in flights over Argentina, powered only by gusts of wind called mountain waves. Photo Credit: James Darcy/Airbus

Science Magazine recently published an article about the Perlan Project’s upcoming flights in El Calafate, Argentina. The Perlan 2 is set to begin a season of flights this week near El Calafate, Argentina, riding waves created by powerful gusts of wind over the Andes Mountains. The goal is to reach a height of 16,700 meters in a series of flights over 2 months, breaking the current glider record. For the full article, click the link below

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/07/glider-aims-new-heights-and-rare-scientific-data

Source: Science Magazine