Jim Purpura CCM’s presentation at Wavelength Brewing Company


On Friday, January 6th, 2017 Jim Purpura CCM of WeatherExtreme Ltd. gave a presentation at the Wavelength Brewing Company in Vista CA. In his presentation, he discussed a new program in Malawai developed by the United Nations (UN) through the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) which aims to create a network of weather watchers who can share forecasts and warnings via cell phone. Below is photo and video from the event. In the video, he gives a brief demonstration of the current communication system being used for weather alerts.




Tornado near Sheridan California 1/9/2017

Monday’s storm system managed to generate a mini-supercell northeast of Sacramento, Ca. This is the first tornado of the year in California.
Fox 40 from Sacramento reported on it in this video…

The National Weather Service issued a storm report and called this a funnel cloud. But the rotating winds are clearly extending to the ground, making it a tornado.

The Base Reflectivity and Storm Relative Velocity are shown from 2:00 pm Monday, January 9. The Reflectivity shows hints of a supercell, including a rear flank downdraft wrapping into the storm. The Storm Relative Velocity at the same time indicates rotation in the updraft above the ground. These are signs to the warning forecaster the storm could produce a tornado.

Although a brief tornado was produced, there were no reports of any damage as this occurred in an open field.

Jim Purpura, CCM

Base Reflectivity of Tornadic Storm near Sheridan, CA
Storm Relative Velocity image of Tornadic Storm near Sheridan, CA

Snow falls in Sahara for First time in 37 years

The Algerian town of Ain Sefra, deep in the dry, hot Sahara desert was hit by a freak snowfall on December 19. It’s the first time snow has fallen in the region in 37 years. View the incredible photos of the town’s sand dunes capped with white snow:

Photo Credits: Karim Bouchetata

Rayleigh-Benárd altocumulus

Rayleigh-Benárd altocumulus - Photo Credit: James D. Means PhD
This image, taken looking upward from Mission Beach in San Diego, California, shows a particular cloud type called cirrocumulus stratiformis, with open cells on the left side of the image and a clear boundary showing closed cells on the right- Photo Credit: James D. Means PhD

Visible satellite images of stratocumulus and cumulus clouds will often exhibit hexagon-like structures that meteorologists call “open cell” and “closed cell” convection. The open cells are rings of cloud with rising air where the clouds are, and sinking air in the open middle of the cloud lattice. The closed cells are the reverse—rings of cloud-free sinking air with rising air and clouds in the middle. In both cases rising air causes clouds to form, while sinking air warms and dries the air and clears that region of clouds.
While such open and closed cell structures are easy to see from orbit, they are more rarely seen from the ground, but the image above is a good illustration of this. This image, taken looking upward from Mission Beach in San Diego, California, shows a particular cloud type called cirrocumulus stratiformis, with open cells on the left side of the image and a clear boundary showing closed cells on the right. If you look carefully you can pick out crude hexagons in the open cell region. The difference between what’s happening on the left and right may be no more than a thinning of the moist layer that generated the clouds, that can be enough to change them from open cells to closed cells.
Open and closed cell convection is a particular example of something that fluid dynamicists call convection, first discovered by Thomson when he was cleaning glasses in warm dishwater outside of a pub, then reproduced in the laboratory by Benárd and explained theoretically by Rayleigh. It’s found that cellular convection occurs in a wide variety of thin fluids that are heated from below. The hexagonal cells that often occur are a result of nature packing the cells into a planar space as close to each other as possible.