A380 Landing at San Francisco

Pilot’s view of the first Airbus 380 landing (Lufthansa) at San Francisco International Airport (KSFO): http://www.wimp.com/approachlanding/.

Runway 28R is adjacent to Runway 28L, where recently, Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crash landed on July 6, 2013, killing 3 and injuring almost 200. Weather is not believed to be a cause in the accident. Conditions at KSFO were fair skies, mild temperatures, light winds, perfect visibility, no precipitation, and no forecast of wind shear.

It is incredible how automated the approach and landing sequences appear to be on these ultra-modern aircraft. There are also some pretty spectacular views of the S.F. Bay Area!

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Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

GOES Satellite Loops

Here’s a really neat site for viewing current, or very recent satellite imagery, even just for fun! NASA makes so many products public on the web, including this.

In the first section titled “Most Recent GOES Images,” the links for individual images, animations, or even .kmz files to load manually as an overlay in Google Earth are available for the western and eastern United States. The “Medium Movie” quality looked fantastic. This one is definitely bookmarked on my machine.

http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Enjoy!

Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

Mammatus Clouds in Michigan

Amazing video capture of mammatus clouds combined with some dramatic and vibrant sunset colors over Michigan’s Upper Peninsula: http://www.latimes.com/news/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-orange-bubble-clouds-video-20130726,0,4837916.story.

Mammatus
Screen capture from the video (Youtube user “jason asselin”).

The article (from The Los Angeles Times) describes mammatus clouds as “upside-down clouds” that appear, round, smooth, and bubbly. I hope to see these with my own eye someday! Mammatus can be an indicator of severe weather nearby, and aviation activity is warned to avoid flying too close when these fascinating shapes are present in the sky.

Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

Future of Sea Level Rise

Dramatic images of flooding associated with hurricane storm surge have been captured along the Gulf Coast and East Coast. But, what would parts of the West Coast look like after a drastic sea level rise? While a hurricane would be classified as a short-term event, long-term sea level rise is considered inevitable, and already occurring by many oceanic and atmospheric scientists.

The Weather Channel posts many interesting articles and photo galleries, such as the story published earlier today on this exact topic. I love to check their page every day, among others, for the latest stories and news. All credit for the images and information belongs to The Weather Channel and artist Nickolay Lamm. Link for direct access: http://www.weather.com/news/science/environment/nickolay-lamm-west-coast-sea-level-rise-pictures-20130711 . While the timing and magnitude of such events are uncertain, it is interesting that some studies suggest significant sea level rise (on the order of a few feet) is very realistic in our lifetime!

Below are a couple of the picture series’ using the San Diego area.

1. Coronado Island:

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AFTER 5-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 12-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 25-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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2. San Diego Convention Center:

NOW
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AFTER 5-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 12-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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AFTER 25-FOOT SEA LEVEL RISE
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Stephen Bone
Meteorologist