Mammatus Clouds in Michigan

Amazing video capture of mammatus clouds combined with some dramatic and vibrant sunset colors over Michigan’s Upper Peninsula: http://www.latimes.com/news/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-orange-bubble-clouds-video-20130726,0,4837916.story.

Mammatus
Screen capture from the video (Youtube user “jason asselin”).

The article (from The Los Angeles Times) describes mammatus clouds as “upside-down clouds” that appear, round, smooth, and bubbly. I hope to see these with my own eye someday! Mammatus can be an indicator of severe weather nearby, and aviation activity is warned to avoid flying too close when these fascinating shapes are present in the sky.

Stephen Bone
Meteorologist

July Rain

It’s a strange day in Southern California today. I have lived in California my entire life (both northern and southern) and can’t remember the last time I felt raindrops July. Besides monsoon thunderstorm activity in the mountains, it’s typically a dry tinder box around here this time of year. This shot of moisture wasn’t anything in the ballpark of a drought-buster, but it was nice to see some green on the radar.

From last night through this morning, most locations in San Diego County have only reported a trace of rain, with a few (mostly in the higher elevation) reporting up to 0.05″ of rain so far. Subtropical moisture will continue flowing into Southern California from the southeast through tonight, so showers should linger for a while, and then mostly hug the mountains and deserts as the day progresses. After that, these rather humid and “muggy” conditions (for our standards) should deteriorate starting tomorrow as the subtropical connection is cut, and the pattern transitions back to normal for this time of year. It looks like there is hope for the end of the marine layer mornings along the coast in the near future as well!

07_11_13
Radar composite at 08:50 PDT showing a rare (and nice) plume of subtropical moisture in the southwest.
(The Weather Channel)

Stephen Bone
Meteorologist